red speed

Save the Internet from WordPress speed abuse.

Updated: September 2017

2 minute read

Using the Disable Emojis plugin removes the emoji functionality added in WordPress 4.2. WordPress does not need emoji. Probably, the worst decision ever made by WordPress Core is enabling emojis by default, and providing no way to disable them. WordPress core developers should have a disable setting instead of having to install another removal plugin. Emoji functions add 5.6k to 14.7k page weight and 2 or 3 HTTP requests to a site.

 

Emoji are the square-grid ideograms, emoticons, or smileys used in Japanese electronic messages and Web pages, the use of which has spread outside Japan. Originally meaning pictograph, the word emoji literally means “picture” + “character.”

Beyond the standard emoticon-type “smileys,” there are hundreds of emoji, ranging from plants and animals to people, objects, vehicles, food, the Sun and Moon, and more.

PagePipe thinks emojis are a waste of bandwidth.
As of July 2016, Disable Emojis plugin has over 30,000 active installs.
As of June 2017, Disable Emojis plugin has over 50,000 active installs.

Emojis may be recognizable by the majority of people, but that doesn’t mean that they’re universally accepted as a professional form of communication.

The usage of emojis may be too distracting to place within the body of your content.

You also have to be careful about placing them in titles or metadata. Google will only display emojis when they deem them to be relevant.

If emojis are obscure or show up differently depending on browsers or devices, your intended message may be confused or misinterpreted. -Author: Suzanne Scacca

Note about why Emojis happened:

“You know emojis in itself are just great, but they should never have been implemented into CORE. Why? At least 98% of active WP sites simply do not use them, still it occupies space and some milliseconds will be wasted in vain. That is a trade-off for nothing for the majority. That is why emojis should have been left as a plugin.” Author: Sam Heavyside

FYI, The emoji implementation was also a way to quietly patch a massive security vulnerability.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQaRUEwEKxE

About Video Published on May 8, 2015

Andrew Nacin walks step by step through how a critical security vulnerability was discovered in WordPress core code and then patched using emoji as a trojan horse in WordPress 4.2.

Godspeed—

Steve Teare
performance engineer

Mobile WordPress Speed – without coding!

What others think of us:


"Your site is the only one I've found that seems to take a serious approach to making a WordPress site fast. Everyone talks about the Yoast plugin, fast hosting, CloudFlare, but I haven't read about time to first byte, image compression or similar subjects elsewhere." medium.com/@nathanpen Texas, USA

by - Nathan Pennington